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Abandon
by Meg Cabot
PUBL. RECOMMENDED AGE: 14+
LEXILE READING LEVEL: 770L {what is this?}
PUBLISHER: Point
YEAR PUBLISHED: 2011
NO. PAGES: 320
GENRE{S}: Fantasy
MAIN CHARACTER GENDER: Female
SERIES: Abandon
SEQUEL: Underworld (Abandon #2)
ISBN: 0545284104
READ & REVIEWED BY: Eden - StorySnoop


The Story
Abandon—Book Review

Seventeen-year-old Pierce knows what it’s like to die. After all, she’s done it, and lived to tell. But while she was briefly in that other world, she met the mysterious John Hayden who is making her return to a normal life—or at least life as she knew it before her accident—next to impossible. Even though she runs to an entirely new life in a new state, he still finds her. And while he is clearly no guardian angel, he always seems to show up when she least expects him and when she needs him the most. She is drawn to him in a way that she can’t explain even though dangerous things always happen when he is near. If Pierce lets herself fall any further, she just might end up in the world that she fears the most: the Underworld.
The Scoop
Abandon—Book Review
{spoiler alert}

Abandon is the first title in a new trilogy by Meg Cabot, which is a modern-day take on the Greek myth of Hades, the leader of the Underworld, and Persephone, the mortal that he kidnapped to be his consort. It’s a fun read with a novel premise that will appeal to fantasy fans looking for something beyond vampires, zombies and fairies. It addresses the concept of death (and what comes after it) as a natural part of the life cycle. Pierce is an appealing heroine who has her flaws but is not afraid to speak her mind or stand up for someone in need. There are traumatic deaths in the story (a drowning, a suicide and a murder), but they are all related after the fact without dwelling on details. The suicide is the result of an inappropriate student-teacher relationship, which Pierce attempts to avenge. Interaction between Pierce and John is limited to kissing, and there is occasional mild language (sl-t, sk-nk, a-s). Environmentally conscious teens will notice subtle and not-so-subtle references to lingering damage in the coastal area from an oil spill attributed to the mega-corporation that Pierce’s father leads.
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